blog.plee.me About software, technology and random things

30Jun/109

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 and the Long Loading Splash

Hi!

If you have used Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 (or several other CS5 products as I've read), you might have encountered long waiting times during the program launching. In the case of Premiere Pro CS5, the splash screen shows "Loading ExporterQuickTimeHost.prm" and sticks with it for a couple of minutes (yes, minutes). This is not even a one-time thing or a once-per-Windows-session, it happens each and every program launch.

When I researched this, I quickly found the answer in Adobe's forums: Premiere CS5 takes 5 minutes to start up

In fact, what's causing this is not just the Adobe program, but rather the combination of a firewall and the Adobe program. If you are as restrictive in terms of Internet access as I am, you might have forbidden Adobe Premiere Pro.exe outgoing IP connections altogether. However, it is trying to establish a TCP connection to localhost / 127.0.0.1.

The fix is to allow outgoing TCP (I chose IP, which of course includes TCP) to 127.0.0.1 for the following executables:

  • <Premiere Directory>\Adobe Premiere Pro.exe
  • <Premiere Directory>\32\Adobe QT32 Server.exe
  • <Premiere Directory>\32\dynamiclinkmanager.exe

with <Premiere Directory> of course being the path to your Adobe Premiere directory.

Note: Of course you can still stop every other outgoing traffic. Regard the 127.0.0.1 rule as an exception.

If you are trying to apply this fix to other Adobe programs, you are on your own to find out which .exes require 127.0.0.1 TCP connections. With modern firewalls, however, this shouldn't be that big of a problem. Just look at the prompts your firewall pops up and/or determine the .exes via logging.

I hope that helps you enjoy your respective Adobe program(s) all the more. 🙂

Good luck and, as always, thanks for reading.

Update (2010-03-28):
I recently found out that with my kind of firewall "Adobe Premiere Pro.exe" would prompt me again for a rule for outgoing traffic to addresses different from the localhost zone. If that happens to you, make sure you don't accidentally replace or override the localhost rule you added above. Rather add an additional rule for all the remaining outgoing traffic and forbid it (or allow it, depending on what you want).

   
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