blog.plee.me About software, technology and random things

17Dec/160

Installing mod_cloudflare For Apache HTTPd 2.4 On Debian 8 (Jessie) Via Aptitude Repository

Hi!

If you are using the Cloudflare proxy functionality, you will find that your web server will end up only working with Cloudflare's IPs instead of the visitors'. After quite some time I thought that there has to be a better way to go about this, and I found mod_cloudflare, a solution officially developed by Cloudflare themselves.

When I was looking at the official Cloudflare documentation on how to install mod_cloudflare for Apache 2.4 on Debian 8 (Jessie) today, I was disappointed to find that they were only recommending manual ways: installing a .deb package or compiling the module yourself.

Luckily I found a guide on how to accomplish the installation with the standard apt-get / aptitude tool for Debian / Ubuntu.

This is how:

  1. Add the aptitude repository to a new sources list file, e.g. at /etc/apt/sources.list.d/cloudflare-main.list - with this content:
    deb http://pkg.cloudflare.com/ jessie main
  2. Download the Cloudflare repository key and add it to the aptitude known keys:
    # wget https://pkg.cloudflare.com/pubkey.gpg
    # apt-key add pubkey.gpg
    # rm pubkey.gpg
  3. Update the aptitude cache:
    # aptitude update
  4. Look at which packages are available in the new repository:
    # grep ^Package: /var/lib/apt/lists/pkg.cloudflare.com_dists_jessie_main_binary-amd64_Packages
  5. Install mod_cloudflare:
    # aptitude install libapache2-mod-cloudflare
  6. Restart the Apache HTTPd service:
    # service apache2 restart

Hopefully this way of installing will enable everyone to update / maintain it much more easily and with less one-time use packages installed.

Additionally, this could prove even more useful for people who want to install more Cloudflare packages.

I am confident that this method also works for Ubuntu and other versions of Debian - just replace the "jessie" part in the aptitude sources list file with your distribution major release codename (like "wheezy" for Debian 7 or "vivid" for Ubuntu 15.04).

Thanks for reading!

Original source: https://emtunc.org/blog/01/2016/installing-mod_cloudflare-ubuntu-14-04-apache-server/

16Nov/142

Mozilla Thunderbird: Changing the EHLO / HELO Value in the “Received”-Header for Outgoing Mail

Hi!

If you have had a look at your outgoing e-mail headers that you've sent from Mozilla Thunderbird, you might have noticed that Thunderbird uses the IP of the network interface that it uses to connect to the internet with by default. If you are using a router on your network, this is a private IP from your LAN (for example 192.168.1.2) instead of one that might be of actual use.

Example:

Received: from external.sender.host.example.org ([123.123.123.123] helo=[192.168.1.2]) by
 mail.example2.org (incoming-mta-service) with esmtpsa (outgoing-mta-service) id
 0a1b2c-3D4e5F6G7h-0a1B2c for <sender@example.org>; Sun, 02 Nov 2014 20:55:41 +0100

where "123.123.123.123" is the publicly facing IP and "external.sender.host.example.org" is its hostname.

If you do not wish to expose this information to every and all recipients of the e-mails you are sending with Thunderbird to (maybe out of security concerns in a business environment), you can set the EHLO / HELO value manually for every outgoing e-mail sent by the Thunderbird client with your current user profile and even for every simple SMTP server individually.

Here's how:

Globally

  • Open your Thunderbird options ("Tools" => "Options")
  • "Advanced" => "Config Editor..."
  • Create (or edit) the entry named "mail.smtpserver.default.hello_argument". If you need to create it, use right-click => "New" => "String".
  • Change the value to the desired IP or hostname (FQDN).

Per SMTP server

  • Open your Thunderbird options ("Tools" => "Options")
  • "Advanced" => "Config Editor..."
  • Create (or edit) the entry named "mail.smtpserver.smtp<number>.hello_argument" where <number> is the ID for the SMTP server you would like to apply the setting to. Type "mail.smtpserver.smtp" to see which ones are available and which ID they have. If you need to create the entry, use right-click => "New" => "String".
  • Change the value to the desired IP or hostname (FQDN).

Technically this value is not relevant for sending/receiving the mail, but because it might be used for spam scoring or simply out of courtesy I would recommend entering a valid IP / hostname.

I myself am using 127.0.0.1.

Thanks for reading!

Sources:

   
%d bloggers like this: